Blog

The MICIC Blog features practitioners’ views on the operationalization of the Guidelines. To contribute please contact the MICIC Secretariat. The opinions expressed in the blog articles are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the MICIC Initiative.

The Libyan uprising of 2011 resulted in a complex and massive mixed population movement of migrants, including refugees, highlighting the central role that outreach and casework have during crises.

Some 15 years of destructive volcanic eruptions totally and definitively devastated the South of Montserrat in the Leeward Islands, British West Indies, including Plymouth the capital city.

Migrants are often among those who suffer the most in disasters, as we have witnessed many times in recent years.

Abdullah grew up in Jimma, the largest city in south-western Ethiopia. Being one of seven children meant for Abdullah that his schooling ended at just 14.

As resilient as I know migrant communities to be, they can still easily be among the worst affected by natural disasters, extreme violence or armed conflict. They have certain heightened vulnerabilities specifically because they are migrants.

Sometimes a promised land becomes a land of shattered dreams.

Cities thrive because of their vibrant and diverse communities. In many migrant communities, factors such as culture, language, immigration status, and community isolation contribute to higher levels of vulnerability to the effects of emergencies.

In 2014 Mexico established its first public policy on migration, in which civil society actors, academics, governmental authorities and the migrants themselves played a key role in identifying the needs to be addressed and the rights to be upheld under the new policy.

Humanitarian agencies now need to reach larger numbers of migrants, in more complex emergencies, than ever before. In much of the media coverage of these responses, social media, apps and web-enabled innovations are touted as possible solutions to these overwhelming needs.