GUIDELINE 4: Incorporate migrants in prevention, preparedness, and emergency response systems

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States and other stakeholders have laws, policies, and programs on prevention, preparedness, and emergency response to reduce the impact of crises. Taking into account the presence of migrants, their vulnerabilities, and their potential needs in prevention, preparedness, and emergency response frameworks, including on disaster risk reduction (DRR), can promote resilience in the event of a conflict or natural disaster. Clear laws and policies on migrants’ eligibility for different types of assistance in the event of a crisis promote certainty. If the MICIC Initiative Guidelines Guidelines: Crisis preparedness 27 presence of migrants is not known or is inadequately incorporated in planning, stakeholders may overlook migrants in their responses. If stakeholders fail to appreciate factors that make migrants vulnerable, such as language barriers, isolated working conditions, irregular immigration status, or mistrust of authorities, responses may be ineffective. When laws and policies are unclear, responses towards migrants can be unpredictable and insufficient.

Migrants themselves and civil society may be in the best position to assist States and other stakeholders to appreciate the presence of migrants, their vulnerability, and needs. In this respect, involving migrants and civil society in the development of prevention, preparedness, and emergency response measures can be helpful. Such actions also build trust between migrant populations and State and non-State actors who provide protection.

Migrants and civil society also have capacities and resources that they can contribute to preparedness and emergency response. Their language abilities, first-hand knowledge of migrant populations, understanding of cultural norms within their communities, and ability to foster greater trust toward State authorities and other actors can be leveraged to create more comprehensive and effective systems and programs.

Sample Practices

  • Platforms to facilitate the engagement of migrants in the design and implementation of prevention, preparedness, and emergency response systems.
  • Taking migrants into account in national and local frameworks on prevention, preparedness, and emergency response, including by recognizing migrants as a specific group with needs and capacities.
  • Recruitment of migrants as staff or volunteers in prevention, preparedness, and emergency response mechanisms.
Country:
Philippines
Type of Practice:
Awareness raising and communication tools

Involving Filipino communities abroad in times of crisis is one of the significant features in Filipino diplomatic posts’ contingency plans.

Country:
Philippines
Type of Practice:
Government bodies

The Executive Order No. 82 operationalizes the practical guide for national crisis managers and the national crisis management core manual; establishes national and local crisis management organizations; and provides funds therefor.

Country:
Philippines
Type of Practice:
Government bodies

The Overseas Preparedness and Response Team (OPRT) was created by Executive Order no. 34 in 2011 by the President of the Philippines.

Country:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom
Type of Practice:
Government bodies

When a country is hit by a disaster which overwhelms its response capacity, European countries can provide assistance via the EU Civil Protection Mechanism. The Mechanism was established in 2001 to foster cooperation among national civil protection authorities across Europe.

Country:
New Zealand
Type of Practice:
Research and reports

This publication seeks to assist central and local government as well as civil society organisations to be better prepared to communicate with culturally and linguistically diverse communities in the event of a civil emergency.

Country:
Global
Type of Practice:
International frameworks and standards

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (SFDRR) was adopted at the Third UN World Conference in Sendai, Japan, on March 18, 2015.